family

Melittid bees (Melittidae)

Melittid bees (Melittidae)

melittid bees Name: Melittidae Rank: family Parent ID: 630955 Melittidae is a small bee family, with over 200 described species in three subfamilies. The family has a limited distribution, with all described species restricted to Africa and the northern temperate zone. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melittidae ID: 154651

Plasterer Bees (Colletidae)

Plasterer Bees (Colletidae)

Plasterer Bees Name: Colletidae Rank: family Parent ID: 630955 The Colletidae are a family of bees, and are often referred to collectively as plasterer bees or polyester bees, due to the method of smoothing the walls of their nest cells with secretions applied with their mouthparts; these secretions dry into a cellophane-like lining. The five…

Mining Bees (Andrenidae)

Mining Bees (Andrenidae)

Mining Bees Name: Andrenidae Rank: family Parent ID: 630955 The Andrenidae (commonly known as mining bees) are a large, nearly cosmopolitan family of solitary, ground-nesting bees. Most of the family’s diversity is located in temperate or arid areas (warm temperate xeric). It includes some enormous genera (e.g., Andrena with over 1300 species, and Perdita with…

Sweat Bees (Halictidae)

Sweat Bees (Halictidae)

Sweat Bees The Halictidae is the second largest family of Apoidea bees. Halictid species occur all over the world and are usually dark-colored and often metallic in appearance. Several species are all or partly green and a few are red; a number of them have yellow markings, especially the males, which commonly possess yellow faces,…

Honey Bees, Bumble Bees, and Allies (Apidae)

Honey Bees, Bumble Bees, and Allies (Apidae)

Name: Apidae
Rank: family
Apidae is the largest family within the superfamily Apoidea, containing at least 5700 species of bees. The family includes some of the most commonly seen bees, including bumblebees and honey bees, but also includes stingless bees (also used for honey production), carpenter bees, orchid bees, cuckoo bees, and a number of other less widely known groups. Many are valuable pollinators in natural habitats and for agricultural crops.